Laws and Regulations Material Handling and Recycling

Waste management laws govern the transport, treatment, storage and disposal of all waste including municipal solid waste, hazardous waste and nuclear waste, among many other types

Waste laws are generally designed to minimize or eliminate the uncontrolled dispersal of waste materials into the environment in a manner that may cause ecological or biological harm, and include laws designed to reduce the generation of waste and promote or mandate waste recycling. Regulatory efforts include identifying and categorizing waste types and mandating transport, treatment, storage, and disposal practices.

Recent legislation is also designed to stimulate circular economy. A Circular Economy is one that is restorative and regenerative by design, and which aims to keep products, components and materials at their highest utility and value at all times. 

United Nations adopted a set of goals to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all as part of a new sustainable development agenda. Each goal has specific targets to be achieved by 2030.

Goal No 12 “Sustainable consumption and production” is about promoting resource and energy efficiency, sustainable infrastructure, and providing access to basic services, green and decent jobs and a better quality of life for all. Its implementation helps to achieve overall development plans, reduce future economic, environmental and social costs, strengthen economic competitiveness and reduce poverty. One of the targets for this goal is to substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse by 2030.

As an example, The European Commission has adopted an ambitious Circular Economy Package, which includes revised legislative proposals on waste to stimulate Europe's transition towards a circular economy which will boost global competitiveness, foster sustainable economic growth and generate new jobs. The revised legislative proposal on waste sets clear targets for reduction of waste and establishes an ambitious and credible long-term path for waste management and recycling.


 

Share our Knowledge

  • 9/10/2019

    The health risks of welding fume, and how to reduce them in the workshop

    In 2017, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) released new scientific evidence showing that exposure to mild steel welding fume can cause lung cancer, and possibly kidney cancer, in humans. As a result, mild steel welding fume has been reclassified as a human carcinogen in the United Kingdom, and it is likely that other countries will follow suit. Moreover, this recent discovery indicates that all welding fume should be seen as potentially carcinogenic, and that measures will need to be taken in order to reduce the health hazards caused by welding fume exposure.
  • 8/19/2019

    The benefits of smart and communicative filter systems

    IoT technology and artificial intelligence are reshaping industrial processes. By gathering data, applying analytics and extracting insights, companies can understand, monitor and maintain the performance and quality of their systems like never before. This is certainly the case with industrial filters as well.